Tag: #project


Green Lab in Malaysia

Green Lab Founder, Andrew Gregson, spent the last week in June 2018 participating in a 5 day workshop in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia in partnerhip with Westminster University, The British Council and University of Malaysia. The intensive trans- and multi-disciplinary five-day workshop was funded by the ‘British Council Researcher Links’, designed to foster an ecosystem for developing resilient social enterprise through entrepreneurial learning.

Over 40 participants from the UK, Europe, US and Asia converged in Kota Kinabalu to take part in the project. Over the five days, small teams traveled to : Kundasang (agro-tourism), Keningau (livestock tourism), Kota Maradu – Teringai (banana plantation), Kuala Penyu (emerging industry), Tambunan (mulberry plantation) with a view to understanding rural needs, potential for social entrepreneurship and to establish local projects.

Mentor and Coaches
Mentors and coaches meet at the start of the week for briefings

Green Lab’s role was to act as a mentor to ‘Team Banana’ (our self nominated name given our project location, and love of the local Sabah banana). Team Banana traveled to the ‘Teringai, Beach and Cafe lodge’; exploring a banana plantation, local community and social ecosystem, building a social context and understanding of the landscape, listening to the needs of the rural community and creating a proposal for social entreprenuership.

Teringai
Teringai Beach and Cafe Lodge
Teringai
Coastal location
Teringai
Visiting local communities

Teringai
Getting to know the landscape
Teringai
Listening to residents
Teringai
Working as a team

Our final proposal and pitch focused on improving local environmental conditions; removing plastics from beaches, edcuation workshops for schools, recycling waste materials and encouraging local communities to self initiate and lead activities. Of the five proposals from the competing teams, presented for peer review at the end of the week, Green Lab and our Team Banana won: our small pot of prize funding will initiate a research project and implement the start of our social entreprenuership.

Team Banana
Team Banana – winning team at Malaysia SITEL 2018

To close the week, we spent Friday morning cleaning a beach at UMS (University Malaysia, Sabah) – sadly the local community disgard a large proportion of plastics into the sea, which accumulate on a beautiful adjacent sandy retreat.

Collecting rubbish from beach

Collecting rubbish from beach

Collecting rubbish from beach

We’d like to thank the SITEL team at Westminister for organising the workshop, their organisational skills and the inspiring team made the project possible. Green Lab is very much looking forward to making our ‘Team Banana’ project come to life.

For more background on the SITEL project visit the Westminster Application page.

Insects. The name is molitor, Tenebrio molitor.

When was the last time you tried a gluten free mealworm french bread? Or maybe a mealworm banana smoothie? Insects are on the menu, and Lucinda Pender a designer and MA Material Futures graduate from Central Saint Martins is fascinated by insect food systems.

Lucinda is exploring the world of entomophagy and mealworm beetles (Tenebrio molitor) researching how insects can be introduced into a western diet, breaking down the cultural taboo surrounding entomophagy and how insects could transform the future of our food.

Green Lab is home to Lucinda’s research project.

“Developing my project, ‘The Entomophagy Welfare Act’ on the MA Material Futures course at Central Saint Martins, I have dedicated the last year exploring the processing system and legislation that would be needed in order to support the mass consumption of mealworms!

Currently, the thought of eating insects for many westerners is seen as a taboo, however the benefits of eating insects is comparable and even in some cases better than traditional meat sources on an environmental and nutritional level, it’s time that insects were taken seriously as a human food source. I truly believe in introducing more people into the world of entomophagy and am constantly excited by how new ideas and developments can all aid to its acceptance.

Farming mealworms at GreenLab means that I have the time and space to develop my knowledge of the mealworm and how ultimately we can utilise them as food for the future.

This is a really exciting time for entomophagy! With a lot of design projects and start-up companies all presenting and developing their own ways to introduce insects to the western diet.

Green Lab is an environment dedicated to the future of sustainable food systems, being able to be contribute to the space as well as be around others exploring their own areas of the future of food is an extremely exciting opportunity for me and my project! And I look forward to what the future of my project holds in the space”

Mealworm Beetle
Mealworms are the larval form of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, a species of darkling beetle.

‘The Entomophagy Welfare Act 2017’ explores the processing system and legislation that would have to be created to support the mass consumption of mealworms as an acceptable and ethical food source for western diets.

Lacking development and regulations has meant that the introduction of mainstream entomophagy has stalled. Currently, there is no law or legislation around the farming, slaughter or preparation of an insect for human consumption in the UK, meaning that even if a commercial company or kitchen wanted to utilise them, they may not be working completely within UK law.

Working with leading entomologists, I have researched, explored and proposed the cleanest, most humane and ethically efficient method of killing a mealworm for human consumption commercially or at home.

Through this project I hope to not only propose future legislation around the preparation and slaughter of mealworms commercially, but to also help make entomophagy more culturally, socially and ethically acceptable to a western society.

We’ll be posting regular updates from Green Lab on the project and you can follow Lucinda Pender on Twitter.