Author: anoushka


We’ve space for you to #grow #farm #ferment #experiment

With the Lab staying put in Bermondsey we now have some affordable temporary project space – if you have an exciting project or area of research you are working on and think you would be a good fit and one of the below options suits your needs make sure you get in touch.

Studio space

We have a studio available to rent in the lower lab – this bright and airy space is over 13 sqm with two large windows letting in plenty of light. The space would be ideal for an individual or small team seeking private space to work.

find out more

Mushroom growing room

We have a dark space with no windows perfect for growing fruiting mushrooms or to experiment with mycelium materials. The space is over 6 sqm and has standing bench desks along the walls

find out more

Fermentation & Brewing room

This room is perfect for fermentation and brewing with its previous tenant brewing fabulous Kombucha. The space is 7.5 sqm.

find out more

Wet Lab

Our downstairs wet lab is now set up with large scale sinks, work benches, a toaster oven, hob and pressure cooker for projects ranging from material exploration, research, growing, farming and making as much mess as required. There is also room to house a few growing bays if required.

find out more

Lower lab floor plan

Floor plan of the lower lab and available space.

Taking a space in the lab also provides you with access to our makerspace with digital fabrication and the wider Green Lab community engaging with food, water and waste issues.

We are also taking applications for our Research Residency programme, to find out more and apply for 3months access to the lab and facilities click here.

Southwark… we’re sticking with you

The Lab has gone a little quiet over the last week – with big decisions to be made…

With the news that our Bermondsey home will stay standing until early 2019 we have decided to stay put and halt our move to Brixton – that’s right Lambeth – I’m afraid you aren’t getting us yet.

It was a difficult decision to make but we feel it is the right one for the lab for now. Over the coming weeks we are going to be focusing our attention identifying what the lab means to people and understanding exactly which are the most important areas for us to continue with.

We’re going to continue our focus on projects and research working with food, water and waste we provide a space to test, research and grow new ideas that are going to make real positive change for the future. The lab will still be open for short term urban agriculture technology and growing projects in our wet lab and also upper clean areas.

To keep up with our latest news and the next steps for the lab sign up to our newsletter

London People’s Feast

Green Lab resident Helene Schulze will be hosting the London People’s Feast on Saturday 27th October from 1pm – 9pm – it’s completely free and will be a day of celebrating the food, cultures and people that make our city so great!

‘Join us to celebrate London’s rich culinary heritage! In light of anti-immigrant sentiment and rising nationalism, we invite you to share food, stories and performance that celebrate a city built on its international connections. Without people from all corners of the world, this city (and its food) would not be half as exciting (or delicious) as it is. In the beautiful Wolves Lane glasshouses, we will have an evening to toast the growers, the chefs, the artists and the eaters. Bring a dish, your kids, a story or a song.’

The day will include a Seed Swap hosted by Growing in Haringey as well as a programme of speakers, performances, music, poetry, workshops and of course FOOD.

Helene and co would love for you to bring a dish along to share that means something to you!

FIND OUT MORE

 

 

Central Saint Martins Degree Show Two

It’s degree show season and we kicked of with Central Saint Martins Degree Show Two last week.

Starting with MA Material Futures which was as always full of the weird and wonderful. With speculative and critical design subjects contextualised through making and the tangible we were guaranteed to find some surprises around the corner of that neon lit wall. With the Labs concern for material exploration and the utilisation of resources the projects that stood out all dealt with materials commonly viewed as waste. From organic waste streams that are prolific and so often discarded as useless to the man made world of plastic we seem to have created.

Sinae Kim

Perhaps the most progressive use of a waste stream was presented by Sinae Kim with her project ‘This is urine’. As the title suggests we were confronted with a series of organic vessels entirely crafted from urine. Their was a sense of the prehistoric about them. Each piece was made using human urine – ‘extracting the minerals to produce clay, distilling it to form a natural glaze and eventually crafting ceramic vessels that nod to the origin of this humble, abundant and completely under-utilised natural resource.’

With each of us producing around 2 litres of urine daily, globally that scales up to over 10.5 billion litres every single day being flushed away – it is a resource that perhaps would make many uncomfortable but clearly has great potential and purpose.

This is urine by Sinae Kim

‘This is urine’ by Sinae Kim

Lulu Wang

Lulu Wang’s project ‘Increasing the value of rice husk’ offered a practical and poetic solution to eliminating the burning of waste rice husk that takes place yearly throughout China. By creating simple but necessary tools such as chop sticks and writing implements with this by-product of the rice farming industry Lulu also tackles the ‘annual haze, a smog that engulfs China and is one of the largest contributors to declining public health.’

Increasing the value of rice husk by Lulu Wang

‘Increasing the value of rice husk’ by Lulu Wang

We saw the much publicised horror of plastic waste tackled by students Charlotte Kidger and Katie May Boyd both utilising this as a raw material to make with.

Charlotte Kidger

Charlotte’s project ‘Industrial Craft’ explored making a new composite from polyurethane foam dust a waste product from CNC milling. By exploring this new material from a hands on practice she has successfully created a new desirable material, with objects that are visually appealing and will no doubt hold value.

Industrial Craft by Charlotte Kidger

‘Industrial Craft’ by Charlotte Kidger

Katie May Boyd

Whilst Katie’s project ‘Foreign Garbage’ focusing on expanded polystyrene (EPS) solely used for packaging made commentary on societies excessive consumption, with little regard to the waste that constantly buying produces. With the recent ban China has brought in, refusing to take any more of our waste the beckoning cat or Maneki-neko symbolises our plastic obsession and adds an element of humour to an otherwise bleak topic.  The project acts as an important ‘tool for discussion around waste.’

Foreign Garbage by Katie May Boyd

‘Foreign Garbage’ by Katie May Boyd

At MA Industrial Designs show the projects we were struck by focused more heavily on growing, utilising tech, open source and hacking to grow, survive and flourish in the city.

Zoe Kahane

One of our favourites was ‘Green Me’ by Zoe Kahane – a project that’s simplicity spoke volumes. ‘Greening the City through active citizen participation’ – the project enables and encourages citizens to green their city, with the notion of positive grafitti the act benefits the environment and people. Using old socks and an easily assembled open source structure the design attaches to railings, lamp columns, and fencing panels temporarily, causing no damage and the ability to be moved and changed. By encouraging citizens to take ownership of their public spaces and actively improve the environment this project acts as a small step that collectively could amount to large change.

Green Me by Zoe Kahane

Green Me by Zoe Kahane

‘Green Me’ by Zoe Kahane

Open Design & Manufacturing

Green Lab is partnered with University of the Arts London (UAL) as part of an EU funded project OD&M (Open Design & Manufacturing). The project connects universities, makerspaces and enterprises to work collaboratively encouraging open-design principles, innovative practice, and sharing ethos to design towards social good.

As a makerspace with a concern for re-designing complex urban food, water and waste systems Green Lab values open-source design and innovation to tackle important challenges for the future and knowledge exchange is fundamental to achieving sustainable practice on a global scale.

OD&M Knowledge

Green Lab took part in ‘Arts Work of the Future’ by Digital Maker Collective at the TATE Exchange from 6th – 11th March 2018. The week long residency was a collaboration between Digital Maker Collective ( a collective of students, alumni & staff from Camberwell, Chelsea & Wimbledon, UAL), MA Industrial Design students from Central Saint Martins and makerspaces – Green Lab and Fab Lab Lodz. The residency encouraged open design principles and knowledge exchange, working collaboratively and inviting the community to engage with and partake in the creation of the work.

Green Lab collaborated with a team of students & staff from Digital Maker Collective to create a Growing Space – an indoor greenhouse exploring indoor farming and sustainable food systems, built using end of life materials and designed to be modular, resulting in the structure physically growing as the week went on alongside the plants. The space invited the public to add sections as they wished, creating a network of growing spaces, planting seedlings in recycled plastic bottles and cups as they went. The design was purposefully self explanatory and easy to assemble, encouraging people of all abilities to engage with building it.

Chillis growing

The space challenged preconceived perceptions of the ability to grow indoors and within the city, encouraging creativity when thinking of the materials and equipment required. By collecting locally salvaged and recycled materials from our urban landscape it poses to redefine the value of objects. As well as producing edible crops the space created a temporary green environment, providing a peaceful space to relax.

Green Lab resident Edward Hill talked of sustainable growing within urban environments, holding a bucket hydroponics workshop – with a few easily accessible and non specialist pieces of equipment you can pick up at a hardware shop (a bucket and lid, rain gullies, piping and a pump) Ed demonstrated how to successfully grow mint in a vertical wall system with just water and nutrients, eliminating the need for soil and space. To read more about the project at the TATE Exchange click here.

Growing space

Gauging the success of building a temporary structure for growing at the TATE Exchange Green Lab has continued the project with a group of students and staff from Chelsea. We are in the process of developing an open-design and modular structure to grow both edible and foliage plants indoors. Throughout a series of workshop’s we have been designing an open source vertical ‘wall’. For this structure we began to consider a set of design parameters and considerations to ensure we are creating in a sustainably aware way. Modularity and open source have directed the design at each step of the process as well as a focus on material exploration and awareness.

We are now in the process of creating a methodology for design, building ‘Open-design lenses’ to act as a series of steps and considerations needed to achieve sustainable open design that’s accessible, collaborative and socially driven. To test our lenses we will create a number of short projects that innovate current urban systems, creating products and environments of change. The OD&M project is a 3 year project ending in December 2019, to find out more have a look here.

Our fermentation resident launches Kompassion Kombucha

Our fermentation expert and Green Lab resident Jon Katona launched Kompassion Kombucha this month. Having spent the last year experimenting with his brewing technique and perfecting his flavours he has officially taken his booch to market.

Jon initially got involved with the lab when we were looking for residents to explore the art of fermentation. Having been introduced to this wonder elixir by a friend and learning how simple it was to make and the multiple health benefits it has, he decided to experiment with making some of his own.

His process was very organic, initially wanting to share his new knowledge with others he started to host workshops at the lab, for people to come and learn how to brew their own kombucha. To keep up with the demand for his workshops he upped his brewing amounts, and as he discovered how simple it was to scale up he decided to take it to market.

Brewed in Bermondsey

Having spent the last 6 years as a bicycle courier Jon decided to utilise his cargo bike and continue to peddle the streets of London, but this time with his own product. Converting his bike into a mobile bicycle bar, he keeps his carbon footprint minimal and his stall compact.

His kombucha is made with organic cane sugar, ceylon black tea and currently has 2 signature flavours; Sarsaparilla Root & Scotch Bonnet Chilli. He is continuing his flavour research and will be expanding his flavours by infusing his kombucha with other medicinal roots, herbs, flowers & fruits.

Booch Bar

Having a booch bar as his market stall also enables the re-use of bottles minimizing single-use packaging. You can get a glass bottle filled up which can then be recycled or re-used, or you can buy a larger re-usable bottle. There’s also the option to bring your own vessel to be filled up and if you can’t resist drinking a glass there and then you can pay a small deposit for a cup which will be refunded when you return it after use.

Having sold out on his first market day, he will now be at Brockley Market most Saturday’s dispensing this magical drink and he will soon be seen at Deptford Bites Market too. Kombucha will also be available for collection from Green Lab, drop an email to kombucha@kompassion.co.uk to arrange.

Buy a bottle

All hail the mighty Pea! Seedlips beautiful garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018

Last night we had the wonderful experience of visiting the Seedlip garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Winning Gold for their ‘Space to Grow’ garden we were keen to see the mighty Pea in all it’s glory. As an ode to this wonderfully familiar veg the entire garden was made up of plants from the Fabaceae family, including a world wide debut of the new Speckled Snap Pea.

Among this newcomer sat multiple varieties of pea, as well as beautiful Lupins, Blue Wild Indigo, the Carob Tree, Red Clover and Legumes.

Seedlip Garden Species

With much of Chelsea focused on foliage plants it was wonderful to Seedlip incorporate so many edible species in to their garden. Growing vegetables in our own gardens is becoming increasingly popular, and with the urban agriculture movement, many people in cities are finding and utilising small spaces to get green fingered – as a showcase for the creme de la creme of garden design it’s incredibly important Chelsea Flower Show adapts to encourage more people to grow both edibles and natives species to boost biodiversity and encourage wildlife back into our gardens.

All in all it was PEAliciously PEAutiful.

Seedlip Lupins

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SEEDLIP & THEIR PEAS.

Green Lab visit to Biohm

Today we had the chance to visit our new friends at Biohm and hear about their use of mycelium and biomaterials to create a more sustainable construction industry. We were shown around by founder Ehab Sayed and learnt more about their material research and incredible plans for the future.

Their mission is to innovate the construction industry to create a healthier and more sustainable built environment, with human centered design and bio materials at their core. Set to challenge the current model of mass construction that rarely considers the negative impact on both the surrounding environment but also on the future inhabitants well being.

They are currently in the materials research phase developing biomaterials from mycelium and other food waste to create alternative living and sustainable materials for insulation and other building purposes. By growing materials and utilising food waste these materials are minimising the wasteful practice often associated with building.

Biohm

‘Placing biological systems at the heart of our inspiration, we combine ideologies of the circular economy and human-centred design with future-tech to create a step-change in building technologies, materials and manufacturing methods.

we collaborate with industrial and academic partners to lead the construction industry towards a circular future that is inspired by nature and driven by our human, environmental and economic needs.’

Ehab Sayad will be speaking about the amazing work they are doing at Biohm at ‘A Mushroom Matter’ a talk curated by Pauline Roques and hosted at Green Lab on Tuesday 29th May from 7-9pm, make sure you get a ticket to hear more about the exciting changes the future holds.

GET TICKETS

The Green Lab team visit Gee Vee Enterprises Ltd. farm at Netherhall Nursery

Last week the Green Lab team spent the day exploring the immense glasshouses and hydroponic systems of Netherhall Nursey – a sweet pepper farm run by our partner and advisor John Cappalonga. It was eye opening to see commercial hydroponics systems built for scale and serious production compared to the ‘slightly’ smaller ones we have set up at the lab.

Green Lab team

Netherhall Nursery is owned by Gee Vee Enterprises Ltd and is located in the heart of the Lea Valley commerical glasshouse district 12 miles north of London. The nursery currently hosts 3 hectares of hydroponic sweet pepper production & is planning to diversify its output by investing in a state of the art aquaponics system in 2020. This investment represents not only commercial benefits, but also interests in sustainable produce and food security in the future, aquaponics being at the forefront of biodiversity. Gee Vee Enterprises Ltd. will become a commerical leader of de-coupled systems in the UK.

Yellow Pepper

With aquaponics being a key area of development for the Lab we will hopefully be able to help research and implement the systems at Netherhall Nursery, providing a testing site for scale that we could only dream of. The collaboration between the lab and John is also extremely important to us as it connects us to the industry actually producing the food that ends up in our supermarkets, bonding the urban agriculture movement to real farming and food production. His knowledge of process, scale and production is invaluable, as is his expertise in growing, something that is learned from years of contact with your crops and growing up in a farming environment. With most of the lab residents only recently venturing into growing and producing food within the city, any expertise from seasoned pro’s is most welcome.

Hydroponic growing lines

 

Green Lab is looking for a new home! can you help?

We need your help!!!

We’re calling on all of you to help find us our new home. Having out-grown our current site we are looking for a new space to call home in the next 6 months or so. It will house our community of makers, researchers and startups searching for alternative solutions to complex urban food, water and waste challenges. Design is at our core and we encourage creativity, collaboration, experimentation and play. We incubate ideas that make our urban food systems more productive and resilient, and that can put more natural and healthy food on our tables.

We are quite a messy bunch, replacing the grey concrete of London with greenery where we can, but we like to think we add charm and a bit of imagination to any space we inhabit. As we continue to grow our efforts will be felt within the direct community we call home, hosting a plethora of free events and workshops to get people through our doors, growing, rethinking and sparking change in the day to day drum of the city.

We need 4000 – 16000 sq.ft to house our lab – this will be made up of desk space with access to all of our facilities with digital makerspace, growing space, an event area that can also be used for our education program working with schools. We would also love to grow our urban farm – creating opportunities for outreach and becoming a hub for the community to come together to discuss health and well being.

Whilst we love Bermondsey & Southwark we are happy to embrace all London boroughs, we’re not picky. So if there’s a disused site you amble past daily that springs to mind, or you know a friend of a friend of a friend who has a connection to a developer, council or building please get in touch and we can explore our options.

Email us at newhome@greenlab.org